Popular

Charlotte Blattner (Harvard Law School)
Expert interviews
Policy

Charlotte Blattner (Harvard Law School)

Charlotte Blattner (Harvard Law School, Animal Law & Policy Program)
01:0620 months ago
Elly Hol (UMC Utrecht): possibilities for neuroscience
Expert interviews
HealthInnovation

Elly Hol (UMC Utrecht): possibilities for neuroscience

Prof. dr. Elly Hol (neuroscientist) talks about the opportunities for conducting animal-free research in Utrecht. She explains why it is necessary to use animal models next to cell-based models, for example for her Alzheimer research. More info at https://www.umcutrecht.nl/en/research/center/brain-center , http://translationalneuroscience.nl , http://www.ellyhollab.eu .
00:599 months ago
TPI.tv: improving science through animal-free innovations and research
Various subjects
InnovationPolicy

TPI.tv: improving science through animal-free innovations and research

Introducing TPI.tv : a video platform by experts striving to improve science through animal-free innovations and research.
01:265 months ago
Katja Wolthers (Amsterdam UMC) - virus research in human models: let's show some guts!
Innovation examples
HealthInnovation

Katja Wolthers (Amsterdam UMC) - virus research in human models: let's show some guts!

To study viruses that make people sick, we often use laboratory animals. However, virus infections in animals are different than in humans. New 3D culture models or 'organoids', which look like human organs in a petri dish, offer a unique opportunity to investigate how viruses enter the human body and cause disease. Our research focuses on enteroviruses such as polio. Due to vaccination, polio is rare, but other enteroviruses are increasingly a threat to young children and patients with impaired immune defenses. There are no medications available, because knowledge about infections with enteroviruses is limited. In our research we use organoids to see how enteroviruses enter the human body and by which means you can prevent that, without the use of laboratory animals. With this project we want to show that our technique can replace the use of laboratory animals in virus research.
02:319 months ago
Helpathon #4 - can you help Frank?
Meeting videos
HelpathonsHealth

Helpathon #4 - can you help Frank?

Can you help Frank with integrating an immune system into a macaque lung organoid to address local immunity to tuberculosis with his vaccination strategy? Join Helpathon #4, look at www.tpihelpathon.nl/coming-up ! Frank Verreck does research on tuberculosis at the Biomedical Primate Research Center (BPRC). Tuberculosis is the most deadly infectious disease worldwide! For the past hundred years, BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guérin) vaccinations take place through the skin. Research shows that macaques can be better protected from this infection by vaccination through their lungs. Frank really wants to further study the potential of this alternative vaccination strategy. He wants to understand how this BCG vaccination works in macaques lungs.
01:2111 months ago
Human neuronal cell models for in vitro neurotoxicity screening and seizure liability assessment
Innovation examples
ToxicologyInnovationIn vitro

Human neuronal cell models for in vitro neurotoxicity screening and seizure liability assessment

Anke Tukker was a PhD candidate in the Neurotoxicology Research group of Dr. Remco Westerink at the Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences at Utrecht University. Dr Westerink’s research group investigates the mechanisms of action of toxic substances on a cellular and molecular level using in vitro systems. Anke's project aimed to develop a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neuronal model for in vitro neurotoxicity screening and seizure liability assessment. Using micro-electrode arrays (MEAs), she showed that these models mimic in vivo neuronal network activity. When these hiPSC-derived neurons are mixed with hiPSC-derived astrocytes, they can be used for in vitro seizure liability assessment. Comparing these data with data obtained from the current used model of ex vivo rodent cortical cultures, she found that these human cells outperform the rodent model. Here research thus contributes towards animal-free neurotoxicity testing. Anke Tukker has won the public vote of the Hugo van Poelgeest prize 2020 for her research on human neuronal cell models for in vitro neurotoxicity screening and seizure liability assessment. Neurotoxicology Research Group, IRAS, Utrecht University: https://ntx.iras.uu.nl/NTX_at_Iras
01:583 months ago
Daniela Salvatori: TPI Utrecht
Expert interviews
HealthEducation

Daniela Salvatori: TPI Utrecht

Prof. dr. Daniela Salvatori, chair of TPI Utrecht, presents the aims of the local TPI group and invites all who want to share their ideas or questions on the transition towards animal-free innovations to get in touch via uu.nl/tpi.
02:238 months ago
Stem cell assays for animal-free developmental neurotoxicity assessment of compounds (video in Dutch)
Innovation examples
ToxicologyIn vitro

Stem cell assays for animal-free developmental neurotoxicity assessment of compounds (video in Dutch)

Victoria de Leeuw worked as a PhD candidate in the research group of prof. Aldert Piersma at the RIVM between 2016 and 2020. Piersma's lab studies the effects of compounds on development of the embryo during pregnancy with among others stem cell cultures. The project of Victoria was aimed to differentiate embryonic stem cells (of mouse and human origin) into neurons and astrocytes, which could mimic small parts of embryonic brain development. These models were able to show some of the known toxic mechanisms induced by these compounds, congruent with what they we hypothesised to mimic. Therefore, these two stem cell assays make a useful contribution to the animal-free assessment of developmental neurotoxicity potential of compounds. Onderzoeker: Victoria de Leeuw op het RIVM. Video: Sophie Koster Videoproducties
02:2320 months ago
Sign in for Helpathon #3: Daniela Salvatori
Meeting videos
HelpathonsEducationInnovation

Sign in for Helpathon #3: Daniela Salvatori

Daniela Salvatori calls for a Helpathon! She invites you to help her and TPI Utrecht to create a unique master course for animal free innovation. You can sign in for this Helpathon here: tpihelpathon.nl. Online, 18th - 19th of June 2020.
01:2915 months ago
Avatar Zoo - teaching animal anatomy using virtual reality
Innovation examples
EducationInnovation

Avatar Zoo - teaching animal anatomy using virtual reality

Animals are essential to train the next generation of scientists understand diseases and develop treatments for humans as well as animals. Therefore, animals are used for educational purposes. Technologies such as Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality can be employed to reduce the number of animals in the future. Prof. Dr. Daniela Salvatori is working on the development of 'Avatar Zoo' together with UMCU and IT. Live animals are replaced by holographic 3D in this flexible platform. With these holograms one is able to study the anatomical, physiological and pathological systems and processes of all kinds of animals. Avatar Zoo won the Venture Challenge 2021 for the development of virtual reality models that can be used for anatomy classes and practical training.
02:4055 days ago
Janny van den Eijnden-van Raaij (hDMT consortium)
Expert interviews
HealthInnovationIn vitro

Janny van den Eijnden-van Raaij (hDMT consortium)

The Institute for human Organ and Disease Model technologies (hDMT) is a precompetitive non-profit technological R&D institute, initiated in the Netherlands. hDMT integrates state-of-the-art human stem cell technologies with top level engineering, physics, chemistry, biology, clinical and pharmaceutical expertise from academia and industry to develop and valorize human organ and disease models-on-a-chip. More information on: www.hdmt.technology , www.h2020-orchid.eu , and www.euroocs.eu .
01:1620 months ago
Tony Kiuru (UPM Biomedicals)
Expert interviews
HealthIn vitro

Tony Kiuru (UPM Biomedicals)

Tony Kiuru discusses GrowDex, which is an animal free, ready to use hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) and supports cell growth and differentiation with consistent results. Bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies GrowDex can be used for 3D cell culture for spheroid and /organoids, in personalised medicine, regenerative medicine, organ-on-a-chip models, drug release studies, 3D printing and much more. GrowDex hydrogel is manufactured according to ISO13485. You can find more information about GrowDex at https://www.upmbiomedicals.com/siteassets/documents/growdex-brochure-2018.pdf and https://www.linkedin.com/company/growdex/ . General email address: biomedicals@upm.com.
01:1120 months ago